Single message in several languages

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AHadley
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Single message in several languages

Post by AHadley » 11 Jun 2014 22:49

Hello!

The following message was left by the Localisation Manager who worked on the late 90s video game Battlezone, hidden in the assets and written in several languages (no doubt as a cruel practical joke at the expense of the user). As a community member intent on archiving the game's contents it's important to me to find out what the message says... but since it's in several languages at once I can't find an automatic translator that will work for it and so I've come to you lovely people. :D

The text is as follows:
briand.des wrote:Jogador wurden aus dem Raum geworfen!!

Cette joueur della partita BattleZone wa daibu joozu ja nai! Está cansado kara!!
The first line looks like German with a Portugese noun at the beginning, and there are bits of French and Portugese in the second, but that's as far as I can get. Would anyone be able to help me?

Thanks in advance,
AHadley

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pc2
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Re: Single message in several languages

Post by pc2 » 13 Jun 2014 14:02

Hello AHadley,

The first Portuguese word, "Jogador", means "Player". The next part, "wurden aus dem Raum geworfen!!", is German, but someone who speaks German will be able to translate it.
The next bit, which seems to be in French and Italian, "Cette joueur della partita BattleZone", seems to be supposed to mean something like "This player of the BattleZone match/game". "Della partita" means "of the match/game" in Italian, but we think that "cette joueur" (in French) should be corrected to "ce joueur" ("This player").
The next bit, "wa daibu joozu ja nai", after a Google search, we think is Japanese (maybe "jouzu" was meant rather than "joozu"), but we also can't translate it.
The last bit in Portuguese, "Está cansado kara!!", means something like "He is tired, man!!". "kara" is actually a (wrong) spelling of "cara" which is commonly used on the Internet. Sometimes people write just "kra" too, because the name of the letter "k" sounds exactly like the syllable "ca".
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Fuokusu
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Re: Single message in several languages

Post by Fuokusu » 13 Jun 2014 14:38

pc2 wrote:but we think that "cette joueur" (in French) should be corrected to "ce joueur" ("This player").
Or to "cette joueuse", the feminine form of "this player". But "ce joueur", the masculine form, makes more sense.
pc2 wrote:The next bit, "wa daibu joozu ja nai", after a Google search, we think is Japanese (maybe "jouzu" was meant rather than "joozu"), but we also can't translate it.
Ayep! And it means either "is pretty good (isn't it?)" if "ja nai (ka)" denotes a rhetorical question or "isn't quite good" if "ja nai" is actually the negative form of what is usually thought to be "to be". However, if we consider the context, the latter makes sense.
pc2 wrote:The last bit in Portuguese, "Está cansado kara!!", means something like "He is tired, man!!". "kara" is actually a (wrong) spelling of "cara" which is commonly used on the Internet. Sometimes people write just "kra" too, because the name of the letter "k" sounds exactly like the syllable "ca".
Another possibility: kara is also a Japanese word and it means "because" or "since". Its use goes as follows: [cause/reason] kara (or node) [consequence/result].
Un Kitsune d'une galaxie lointaine... Oui,c'est moi...

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ElieDeLeuze
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Re: Single message in several languages

Post by ElieDeLeuze » 13 Jun 2014 18:30

jouzu = 上手 (japanese).

daibu joozu ja nai = 大分上手じゃない。
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AHadley
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Re: Single message in several languages

Post by AHadley » 13 Jun 2014 20:44

The German I can do myself - "wurden aus dem Raum geworfen" is roughly "were thrown out of the room".... so, "the players were/player was thrown out of the room". Singular or plural, I wonder?

The second line looks like this thus far: "This player of the Battlezone game is quite good, isn't it (should that be gender-specific?)? He's tired, man!" Perhaps that last line should be "isn't quite good because he's tired"?

Mathea
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Re: Single message in several languages

Post by Mathea » 13 Jun 2014 21:20

Hello AHadley and everyone!

What an interesting question!

The first sentence “Jogador wurden aus dem Raum geworfen!!” is in Portuguese and German just as you and PC2 said, and means “Player has been kicked out of the room!!” (Presumably a video game room.)

The second sentence contains these Japanese words:
wa – (the topic marker, which marks the topic of a sentence by immediately following it. In the Japanese portion of the sentence, there’s only one noun “BattleZone”, and it’s followed by “wa” designating it as the topic of this sentence segment. No equivalent of “wa” exists in English.)
daibu = mostly; overall
joozu = skillful; clever; good (at something)
ja nai = is not

Now let’s examine this second sentence “Cette joueur della partita BattleZone wa daibu joozu ja nai!”
“Cette joueur” means “This player” in French, and “della partita” means “in the game” in Italian. Checking out the Japanese words, we realize what the sentence means: “This player is overall not skillful in the game BattleZone!” or “This player is mostly no good in the game BattleZone!” or perhaps better yet “This player isn't much good in the game BattleZone!” (By the way, please correct me if any of this is wrong, Fuokusu or ElieDeLeuze, as I am not very familiar with Japanese.)

The third sentence or rather phrase “Está cansado kara!!” explains why the player didn’t play well.
“Está cansado”, in both Portuguese and Spanish, translates here as “He is tired”. The Japanese word “kara” means “because”. The phrase simply means “Because he is tired!!”

In full, the text translates:
Player has been kicked out of the room!!
This player isn't much good in the game BattleZone! Because he is tired!!


Happy June!
Mathea

AHadley
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Re: Single message in several languages

Post by AHadley » 14 Jun 2014 02:21

Thank you all very much for your help! The translation you've all so helpfully provided me has been added to Brian Diggs' page on the Battlezone Wiki.

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