va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Besoin d'une traduction dans toutes les langues possibles ?
Do you need something translated into as many languages as possible?

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Anuanua
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Re:

Post by Anuanua »

SubEspion wrote:Dans la variante québécoise, il y a le « sacre ton camp » (prononcé plutôt comme « sac' ton camp ») que j'aime bien. :lol:
Oui! Aussi "décolle!". On pourrait aussi dire "Kestu fa icitte?", "T'as pas d'affaire icitte." Ou "T'es encore là, toé???"
SubEspion wrote:J'essaie d'éviter de tomber dans le Saint blasphème. :lol:
Il m'enlève les mots de la bouche, car "va-t'en" ne manque pas de traductions en québécois! Mais je n'ose pas les mettre ici. Je me limiterai à répéter les mots de Gilles Vigneault : "Quand quelque chose n'est pas à notre goût, au Québec, on prie!" :loljump:



En reo tahiti et reo ma'ohi, "va-t'en" serait haere atu ! [ haéré atou !]
I te rahiraa o te taime, mea pāpū aè te reo ia taì mai i te mafatu, e mea haavarevare roa atoā rä o ia.
La langue est souvent plus éloquente, mais aussi plus trompeuse que le coeur.

Kaykay22
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Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Kaykay22 »

Indonesia: pergi or minggir. Thx.

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Anuanua
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Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Anuanua »

I notice you are a new member, Kaykay22. This short word just to say : "Welcome"!

Image
I te rahiraa o te taime, mea pāpū aè te reo ia taì mai i te mafatu, e mea haavarevare roa atoā rä o ia.
La langue est souvent plus éloquente, mais aussi plus trompeuse que le coeur.

Kaykay22
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Location: Indonesia

Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Kaykay22 »

Thank you. Anyway, I can't speak french. So, I can't reply all the questions that are written in french language. So, sorry.

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Anuanua
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Re:

Post by Anuanua »

dYShock wrote:Oui, enfin, c'est la variante plus douce, parce qu'il y a encore « cri*** ton camp » qui est plus.. sévère, et plus courant. :P
On est effectivement plus près du "Saint Blasphème" dont parlait Sub-Espion... :loljump: Une version plus courante serait simplement décri**e!

Mais là, ne me demandez pas de traduite pour Kaykay22! LOL!

@ Kaykay22
As you can see, I can read and write both. If you want to know, just ask. I, or ony of the many others, will be happy to help. (We are on a translator's forum. And those you post here just love translating. Just for the fun of it. We even do it for free in FREELANG!
Last edited by Anuanua on 25 Jan 2011 23:00, edited 1 time in total.
I te rahiraa o te taime, mea pāpū aè te reo ia taì mai i te mafatu, e mea haavarevare roa atoā rä o ia.
La langue est souvent plus éloquente, mais aussi plus trompeuse que le coeur.

Kaykay22
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Joined: 22 Jan 2011 07:20
Location: Indonesia

Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Kaykay22 »

Thank you. Usually, I read them all first then I search if there anyone translate it into english or chinese or spanish. I read the translation first then I translate it into my language. Sometimes, I read the french translation too then I search the meaning in my dictionary. Thx for all.

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Anuanua
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Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Anuanua »

Kaykay22 wrote:...then I translate it into my language.
What is your own language, Kaykay22?
I te rahiraa o te taime, mea pāpū aè te reo ia taì mai i te mafatu, e mea haavarevare roa atoā rä o ia.
La langue est souvent plus éloquente, mais aussi plus trompeuse que le coeur.

Kaykay22
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Location: Indonesia

Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Kaykay22 »

Indonesian. As u see, I translate them into indonesian language.

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Anuanua
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Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Anuanua »

Indonesia... that explains the hours you post! I live at the opposite : in Canada. We have a 12 hours difference.

Indonesia is very large, extending from the south of Thaïland and Malaysia all the way into Papua. Where about do you live in Indonesia? Around Java, Sulawesi, Papua...?

This interests me because I am the representative of ma'ohi (polynesian) languages on Freelang. And, since the Ma'ohi migrated from Indonesia, maybe there are still some analogies between these languages. Though I doubt the can be many : this migration took thousands of years! Maybe there would be more analogies with the Maori language...?

Just for comparison : my pseudo, anuanua, is the ma'ohi name for "rainbow". How do you say "rainbow" in indonesian?
I te rahiraa o te taime, mea pāpū aè te reo ia taì mai i te mafatu, e mea haavarevare roa atoā rä o ia.
La langue est souvent plus éloquente, mais aussi plus trompeuse que le coeur.

Kaykay22
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Location: Indonesia

Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Kaykay22 »

Hi, hahahaha yes, i'm in Indonesia....it's 9 pm now...and we are ready to sleep...yes, you're right, Indonesia is very large...i live in Sumatra Island! We have a lot of islands! We call "pelangi" for rainbow here. I don't know much about language and i don't know the relationship between Indonesian language and Ma'ohi language.

Anyway, Indonesian language has the grammar that is very similar with Spanish language...but, the words are very different.

Anyway, i want to ask you something...how can the people in freelang are very fluently in French? French language is not popular here...usually, students here take English or Chinese or German as their second language. hahaha...

thx. Anyway, what is the meaning of "l'avevo"? and what is the meaning of "la" or "ne" or "me" or "tu" or "te" ?
Sorry for asking to much because i don't understand French. thx u very much.

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Anuanua
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Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Anuanua »

So you live on the very large island of Sumatra. Exactly on the equator. Do you have seasons there? Here, at 45° north, we certainly do!

Well... "pelangi" is quite different from "anuanua"! Looks like there has been a few mutations of the language during the looooong migration!

You say the grammar is very similar to that of the spanish language. Once again you surprise me : the ma'ohi language has NOTHING in common with spanish! Nor with any latin language as a matter of fact. In fact, I am quite surprised to learn that indonesian language has any ressemblance to spanish : I tought that is a very ancient language, mostly of asiatic, indian and sumerian origins. And I can't help but see a ressemblance between "Sumatra" and "sumerian". I may be 100% wrong here though!

Many people on Freelang and Lokanova (a word coming from "loca" which is related to "locution", the ability to express oneself ; and "nova" which means "new") are fluent in French because these sites have been initiated by Latinus who is French and lives in France and by Beaumont who is also French although he now lives in Thaïland (thus not so far away from you). The forums themselves were originally French only, but now there a many Freelang forums, including one in English and one in Spanish. Still, the majority of members are fluent in French. They kept it open for you to start the Indonesian Freelang! :loljump:

"L'avevo" is not French! I do not know of anything like this in French. Phonetically, it sounds like "l'avez-vous?", which means "do you have it?". Or "lavez-vous" which means "clean yourself".

"La" is an article that means "the" when related to a feminine word. For example : "la femme" : "the woman". If it is related to a masculine word, it becomes "le" like in "le cheval" : "the horse". As a name, "la" also means the music note or key or scale "A" : a concerto in A sharp would be, in French, "un concerto en la majeur".

"Ne" is a negation. It negates the verb that follows it. It is usually associated with "pas" which completes the negation cycle. For example "Marchez ici" means "Walk here". "Ne marchez pas ici" means "Do not walk here".

"Me" means "to me" or "myself". "Je me regarde dans le miroir" means "I am looking at myself in the mirror".

"Tu" and "te" are personnal pronouns of the second person and mean "you" or "yourself". "Tu" is used as a subject and "te" as a complement. For example "Tu te regardes dans le miroir" means "You are looking at yourself in the mirror".

Voilà voilà voilà (That's all folks!)
I te rahiraa o te taime, mea pāpū aè te reo ia taì mai i te mafatu, e mea haavarevare roa atoā rä o ia.
La langue est souvent plus éloquente, mais aussi plus trompeuse que le coeur.

Kaykay22
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Location: Indonesia

Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Kaykay22 »

yes, you're right! Exactly on equator! When you come here (especially Bali, i think you know that there are a lot of beaches), don't forget to do sunbathing! Our climate here is very hot. we get sunshine along the year. We don't have 4 seasons, we just have rainy season and dry season. In rainy season, we have hard rain along the day...sometimes it will be followed by thunder or maybe it likes a storm hahaha...but it doesn't happen in dry season...hot everywhere and people will turn on their air conditioner along the day. We never get snow here.

I think Maori language has the same "style" of words with traditional language in Sulawesi or east Indonesia. As i know, "anuanua", the word is very similar with Sulawesi traditional language. For your information, people in Polynesia have similar posture or type or something like that with people in Sulawesi. There is a kind of Sulawesi local animal. They call it "anoa" and their language is around that word.

Anyway, thank you for your explanation above...i will try to understand french from their post hahaha..i always open my dictionary for every word! It's 9.48 am now, i want to have breakfast now. Bye!

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Anuanua
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Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Anuanua »

I think the "anoa" is some kind of bovine (cattle), something like this (thanks Google!). I do not think that, although the words may sound somewhat alike, there is a direct link between the Sulawesi and Maori word "anoa" and the Ma'ohi "anuanua" which means "rainbow".

For what follows, I suggest you open a new window with this address :
http://www.farevanaa.pf/arbre.php
as I will refer to this drawing. It is a "genealogic tree", or parental link (which is called "braided strings" in their language : "taura firi") of most of Oceanian languages that can be found on the site ot the Tahitian Academy Fare Vāna'a.

Many have a temptation of confounding "Māori" and "Ma'ohi". These are quite different languages. So different, in fact, that I would not be surprise if they came from either very far ancient origins or from completely different ones. If we look at the family tree, we notice that Māori appears (at the extreme right) as descending from the proto-tahitian source. That surprises me as most Ma'ohi languages ressemble each other so much that if I know, let's say, "reo tahiti", I can "understand" (though not always easily) the various reo ma'ohi from Tapuboe (the rightmost of the group of eight at the right of the picture) to Mitiroa (or Mihiroa : both terms are used) which are the eight languages spoken in the Tuamotu. I will, of course, understand both forms of reo tahiti (since we supposed I started from there). And many Samoan languages won't look very alien to me. As a matter of fact, I can understand (with some help) some samoan and fidjian songs. (Samoan languages appear way to the left of the "tree" or "rope", under "Proto Samoan Extérieur".) At least this is true for me who studied reo tahiti. Yet, I can't even begin to understand a text written in Māori! Nor in Rarotongian (extreme right, next to Māori).

Not only are Māori and Ma'ohi languages very different, thus forbidding to make direct relations between words that "look" or "sound" similar, but many words in reo ma'ohi that are very very similar mean completely different things! As an illustration of this, look at those two words :
'ahi'ahi which is a kind of fish (which you may know by the name of mahi-mahi)
ahiahi which means a wound or a scar.

Mind you : these are two words of the same language (reo tahiti). There are not a few, but hundreds of such homophones in these languages. So, care is necessary in the interpretion of "similar" words in these languages.
I te rahiraa o te taime, mea pāpū aè te reo ia taì mai i te mafatu, e mea haavarevare roa atoā rä o ia.
La langue est souvent plus éloquente, mais aussi plus trompeuse que le coeur.

Nartezalation
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Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by Nartezalation »

Je pense qu'en norvégien on dirait: GÅ DIN VEI. Je n'en suis pas sûr, j'aimerais qu'on me verifie.

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ElieDeLeuze
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Re: va-t'en dans toutes les langues?

Post by ElieDeLeuze »

Nartezalation wrote:Je pense qu'en norvégien on dirait: GÅ DIN VEI. Je n'en suis pas sûr, j'aimerais qu'on me verifie.
Gå din vei existe, c'est très bien. Aussi Gå din egen vei.
Il y a des chances pour que ce soit des formules différentes dans les situations où en français, "va-t-en" est naturel. D'abord, souvent, ils ne disent rien du tout. Ensuite, laisse-moi tranquille est assez probable (La meg i fred). Enfin, la colère donne assez régulièrement Gå til helvete ou Dra til helvete.
www.rtr.ch - Tgi che sa rumantsch sa dapli

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